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Mount Tarawera (1111 m)
North Island, New Zealand

10. Mount Tarawera (1111 m)

Mount Tarawera is the volcano responsible for one of New Zealand's largest historic eruptions. Located 24 km southeast of Rotorua in the North Island, it consists of a series of rhyolitic lava domes that were fissured down the middle by an explosive basaltic eruption in 1886. These fissures run for about 17 km northeast-southwest. The volcano's component domes include Ruawahia Dome (the highest at 1111 m), Tarawera Dome and Wahanga Dome.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Mitre Peak (1692 m)
South Island, New Zealand

9. Mitre Peak (1692 m)

Mitre Peak is an iconic mountain in the South Island of New Zealand. It is one of the most photographed peaks in the country. The distinctive shape of the peak in southern New Zealand gives the mountain its name, after the mitre headwear of Christian bishops. It was named by a survey crew from the HMS Acheron.

/Wikipedia.org/

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8. Lake Pukaki

Lake Pukaki is the largest of three roughly parallel alpine lakes running north-south along the northern edge of the Mackenzie Basin on New Zealand's South Island. The others are Lakes Tekapo and Ohau. All three lakes were created when the terminal moraines of receding glaciers blocked their respective valleys, forming moraine-dammed lakes. The glacial feed to the lakes gives them a distinctive blue colour, created by glacial flour, the extremely finely ground rock particles from the glaciers.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Nugget Point
Otago Coast, New Zealand

7. Nugget Point

Nugget Point is one of the most iconic landforms on the Otago coast. Located at the northern end of the Catlins coast down the road from Kaka Point, this steep headland has a lighthouse at its tip, surrounded by rocky islets (The Nuggets). The point is home to many seabirds, including penguins, gannets and spoonbills, and a large breeding colony of fur seals.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Mount Ngauruhoe (2291 m)
North Island, New Zealand

6. Mount Ngauruhoe (2291 m)

Mount Ngauruhoe is an active stratovolcano or composite cone in New Zealand, made from layers of lava and tephra. It is the youngest vent in the Tongariro volcanic complex on the Central Plateau of the North Island, and first erupted about 2,500 years ago. Although seen by most as a volcano in its own right, it is technically a secondary cone of Mount Tongariro.

/Wikipedia.org/

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5. Frying Pan Lake

Frying Pan Lake is the largest hot spring in the world. It is located in Waimangu Volcanic Rift Valley, New Zealand. Waimangu Volcanic Rift Valley is the hydrothermal system created on 10 June 1886 by the volcanic eruption of Mount Tarawera, on the North Island of New Zealand. It encompasses Lake Rotomahana, the former site of the Pink and White Terraces. It was the location of the Waimangu Geyser, which was active from 1901 to 1904.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Champagne Pool
Waiotapu, New Zealand

4. Champagne Pool

Champagne Pool is a prominent geothermal feature within the Waiotapu geothermal area in the North Island of New Zealand. The terrestrial hot spring is located about 30 km southeast of Rotorua and about 50 km northeast of Taupo. The name Champagne Pool is derived from the abundant efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2), similar to a glass of bubbling champagne.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Mount Cook (3754 m)
South Island, New Zealand

3. Mount Cook (3754 m)

Mount Cook is the highest mountain in New Zealand, reaching 3754 metеrs. It lies in the Southern Alps, the mountain range which runs the length of the South Island. A popular tourist destination, it is also a favourite challenge for mountain climbers.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Lake Rotoehu
Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

2. Lake Rotoehu

Lake Rotoehu is the smallest in a chain of three lakes to the northeast of Lake Rotorua in North Island, New Zealand. It is located between the city of Rotorua and town of Whakatane. The southern end of the lake occupies part of the Okataina caldera. It is fed (underground seepage) by Lake Rotoma to the east, and flows westward joining Lake Rotoiti.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Pohutu Geyser
Whakarewarewa, New Zealand

1. Pohutu Geyser

Pohutu Geyser is a geyser in the Whakarewarewa Thermal Valley, Rotorua. Pohutu means /big splash/ or /explosion./ The main geyser of the area, it spurts up to twenty times per day and can reach heights of up to 30 metres.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Interesting Fact

Alcázar of Segovia, Spain

The castle was one of the inspirations for Walt Disney's Cinderella Castle.

Facts about Landmarks

Peaks by Height

Landmark Mount Everest (8848 m)
Landmark K2 (8611 m)
Landmark Manaslu (8163 m)
Landmark Nanga Parbat (8126 m)
Landmark Jengish Chokusu (7439 m)
Landmark Aconcagua (6962 m)

Antiquity by Age

Landmark Stonehenge
Landmark Pyramid of Khufu
Landmark Pyramid of Khafre
Landmark Pyramid of Menkaure
Landmark Great Sphinx of Giza
Landmark Petra

Caves by Length

Landmark Mammoth Cave
Landmark Bacho Kiro Cave
Landmark Magura Cave
Landmark Devetashka Cave
Landmark Uhlovitsa Cave
Landmark Ledenika Cave

Tips for Trips

Top 10 Landmarks
New Zealand

Top 10 Legends of Landmarks

"The wilderness holds answers to questions man has not yet learned to ask."

Nancy Newhall