Legends of Landmarks

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Edgbaston Waterworks Tower
Birmingham, England

Legend of Edgbaston Waterworks Tower, England

It has been suggested, but not proven, that the towers of Perrott's Folly and Edgbaston Waterworks Tower may have influenced references to the two towers in the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien, who lived nearby as a child.

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Perrott Folly
Birmingham, England

Legend of Perrott Folly, England

There are many stories to explain why the tower was built. One is that John Perrott wanted to be able to survey his land and perhaps entertain guests. Or the tower might have been used to spot animals for hunting. Or that he built the tower so that he could see his wife's grave, 15 miles away.
It has been suggested, but not proven, that the towers of Perrott's Folly and Edgbaston Waterworks Tower may have influenced references to the two towers in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien, who lived nearby as a child.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Katskhi Pillar Complex
Imereti, Georgia

Legend of Katskhi Pillar Complex, Georgia

A number of local legends surround the pillar. One of them has it that the top of the rock was connected by a long iron chain to the dome of the Katskhi church, located at a distance of around 1.5 km from the pillar.

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Chocolate Hills
Bohol Province, Philippines

Legend of Chocolate Hills, Philippines

Four legends explain the formation of the Chocolate Hills. The first tells the story of two feuding giants who hurled rocks, boulders, and sand at each other. The fighting lasted for days, and exhausted the two giants. In their exhaustion, they forgot about their feud and became friends, but when they left they forgot to clean up the mess they had made during their battle, hence the Chocolate Hills.
A more romantic legend tells of a giant named Arogo who was extremely powerful and youthful. Arogo fell in love with Aloya, who was a simple mortal. Aloya's death caused Arogo much pain and misery, and in his sorrow he could not stop crying. When his tears dried, the Chocolate Hills were formed.
The third legend tells of a town being plagued by a giant carabao, who ate all of their crops. Finally having had enough, the townsfolk took all of their spoiled food and placed it in such a way that the carabao would not miss it. Sure enough, the carabao ate it, but his stomach couldn't handle the spoiled food, so he defecated, leaving behind him a mound of feces, until he had emptied his stomach of the food. The feces then dried, forming the Chocolate Hills.
The last legend is about a gluttonous giant named Miguel that eats everything in his path. One day he came to a plain. He saw a beautiful young woman named Adrianna. To win her affection, he needed to lose weight. So he excreted everything he ate. In the end, his fecal matter covered the land and he won Adrianna's affection.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Mount Tarawera (1111 m)
North Island, New Zealand

Legend of Mount Tarawera (1111 m), New Zealand

Legend surrounding the 1886 eruption is that of the phantom canoe. Eleven days before the eruption, a boat full of tourists returning from the Terraces saw what appeared to be a war canoe approach their boat, only to disappear in the mist half a mile from them. One of the witnesses was a clergyman, a local Maori man from the Te Arawa iwi. Nobody around the lake owned such a war canoe, and nothing like it had been seen on the lake for many years. It is possible that the rise and fall of the lake level caused by pre eruption fissures had freed a burial waka (canoe) from its resting place. Traditionally dead chiefs were tied in an upright position. A number of letters have been published from the tourists who experienced the event. Though skeptics maintained that it was a freak reflection seen on the mist, tribal elders at Te Wairoa claimed that it was a waka wairua (spirit canoe) and was a portent of doom. It has been suggested that the waka was actually a freak wave on the water, caused by seismic activity below the lake, but locals believe that a future eruption will be signalled by the reappearance of the canoe.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Tower of Hercules
A Coruña, Spain

Legend of Tower of Hercules, Spain

Through the millennia many mythical stories of its origin have been told. According to a myth that blends Celtic and Greco-Roman elements, the hero Hercules slew the giant tyrant Geryon after three days and three nights of continuous battle. Hercules then — in a Celtic gesture — buried the head of Geryon with his weapons and ordered that a city be built on the site. The lighthouse atop a skull and crossbones representing the buried head of Hercules’ slain enemy appears in the coat-of-arms of the city of Corunna.
Another legend embodied in the 11th-century Irish compilation Lebor Gabála Érenn — the "Book of Invasions" — King Breogán, the founding father of the Galician Celtic nation, constructed here a massive tower of such a grand height that his sons could see a distant green shore from its top. The glimpse of that distant green land lured them to sail north to Ireland. According to the legend, these Breogán's descendants who stayed in Ireland and their followers are the Celtic ancestors of the current Irish people. A colossal statue of Breogán has been erected near the Tower.

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Mount Fuji (3776 m)
Honshu Island, Japan

Legend of Mount Fuji (3776 m), Japan

The forest at the north west base of Mount Fuji is named Aokigahara. Folk tales and legends tell of demons, ghosts, and goblins haunting the forest, and in the 19th century, Aokigahara was one of many places poor families abandoned the very young and the very old.
The creation of Mount Fuji is itself a matter of legend in Japan - the tale goes that the mountain was born in a single day. The story relates the experiences of a woodsman named Visu. He was awoken one night by a loud noise, seemingly coming from under the Earth. The woodsman believing it to be an earthquake, grabbed his family and ran from their home. When he emerged from the doorway, he saw that the land near his home, which had been flat and dead, had become a mountain. Visu was so in awe of this occurrence, and the majesty of the mountain, that he named it "Fuji-yama", the Never-Dying Mountain.
Mount Fuji is the source of many myths, underscoring its importance in Japanese society; it has been the home of multiple deities, including the goddess Sengen, also known as the Goddess of Fuji, whose temple was once said to reside on the summit of the mountain. In the days of religious pilgrimages to Mount Fuji, it is said that Sengen would throw from the mountain any pilgrims that were impure of heart.

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Shiprock (2188 m)
Navajo, United States

Legend of Shiprock (2188 m), United States

The Navajo name for the peak, Tsé Bitʼaʼí, "rock with wings" or "winged rock", refers to the legend of the great bird that brought the Navajo from the north to their present lands. The peak and surrounding land are of great religious and historical significance to the Navajo people. It is mentioned in many Navajo myths and legends. Foremost is the peak's role as the agent that brought the Navajo to the southwest. According to one legend, after being transported from another place, the Navajos lived on the monolith, "coming down only to plant their fields and get water." One day, the peak was struck by lightning, obliterating the trail and leaving only a sheer cliff, and stranding the women and children on top to starve. The presence of people on the peak is forbidden "for fear they might stir up the chį́įdii (ghosts), or rob their corpses."
In a legend that puts the peak in a larger geographic context, Shiprock is said to be either a medicine pouch or a bow carried by the "Goods of Value Mountain", a large mythic male figure comprising several mountain features throughout the region. The Chuska Mountains comprise the body, Chuska Peak is the head, the Carrizo Mountains are the legs, and Beautiful Mountain is the feet.
One legend has it that Bird Monsters nested on the peak and fed on human flesh. In one version, after Monster Slayer destroyed Déélééd at Red Mesa, he killed two adult Bird Monsters at Shiprock and changed two young ones into an eagle and an owl. (In another version, the Warrior Twins were summoned to rid the Navajo of the Bird Monsters.)
The peak is mentioned in stories from the Enemy Side Ceremony and the Navajo Mountain Chant. It is associated with the Bead Chant and the Naayee'ee Ceremony.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Zemen Monastery
Zemen, Bulgaria

Legend of Zemen Monastery, Bulgaria

There is a legend that when you put your left hand on the oltar in the church "St. John the Theologian" and make a wish, it will come true.
Another legend says that a holy relic, was kept in the stone altar inside the church "St. John the Theologian", but in order to preserve it, it was split in three parts during the Middle Age and spread around the world.
Another legend says the treasure of Tsar Mihail III Shishman is buried nearby. The Tsar was killed in a battle with the Serbian ruler Stefan Dechanski in 1330 near what was known as the Zemlungrad fortress. It is believed the name Zemen comes from either “zavzemane” or “zemiya” – in Bulgarian to conquer or earth respectively.
One of the oldest legends circulating around the Zemen area is the next one. A master mason and his apprentice decided to hold a contest – who will build a more beautiful church. There had been only one rule – not to see the other’s work until completed. The two built their churches 10 km one from the other along the banks of the Struma River. When the construction was finished, a huge crowd, headed by the local nobility, came to judge. The master saw the work of his student, exclaimed in admiration and ordered his helpers to demolish his own church.

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Mount Kenya (5199 m)
Mount Kenya National Park, Kenya

Legend of Mount Kenya (5199 m), Kenya

The main ethnic groups living around Mount Kenya are Kikuyu, Ameru, Embu and Maasai. The first three are closely related. They all see the mountain as an important aspect of their cultures. All these cultures arrived in the Mount Kenya area in the last several hundred years.
The Kikuyu live on the southern and western sides of the mountain. They are agriculturalists, and make use of the highly fertile volcanic soil on the lower slopes. They believe that God, Ngai or Mwene Nyaga, lived on Mount Kenya when he came down from the sky. They believe that the mountain is Ngai's throne on earth. It is the place where Kikuyu, the father of the tribe, used to meet with God. Thus according to the Kikuyu records, Kikuyu is the first person on Earth to ascend the mountain. Kikuyus used to build their houses with the doors facing the mountain. The Kikuyus name for Mount Kenya is Kirinyaga, which literally translates to "God's Resting Place" or "Where God Lives" in this case referring to Mwene Nyaga.
The Embu people live to the south-east of Mount Kenya, and believe that the mountain is God's home (Meru word for God is Ngai or Mwene Njeru). The mountain is sacred, and they build their houses with the doors facing towards it. The Embu people are closely related to the Ameru and Mbeere people. The Mbeere and Akamba are the settlers of the southeast side of the Mountain.
The Ameru occupy the east and north slopes of the mountain. They are generally agricultural and also keep livestock and occupy what is among the most fertile land in Kenya. The Meru God Murungu was from the skies.
The Maasai are semi-nomadic people, who use the land to the north of the mountain to graze their cattle. They believe that their ancestors came down from the mountain at the beginning of time. The Maasai name for Mount Kenya is Ol Donyo Keri, which means "mountain of stripes" depicting the dark shades as observed from the surrounding plains.

/Wikipedia.org/

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Interesting Fact

Tavurvur (223 m), Papua New Guinea

On 7 October 2006 Tavurvur erupted and the initial blast shattered windows up to 12 km away and sent an ash plume 18 km into the stratosphere.

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