Art Pictures

Dunguaire Castle, Ireland

License: CC BY-ND 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0.Picture by rosario fiore

Dunguaire Castle, Ireland
Dunguaire Castle (Irish: Dún Guaire) is a 16th-century tower house on the southeastern shore of Galway Bay in County Galway, Ireland, near Kinvarra (also spelled Kinvara). The name derives from the Dun of King Guaire, the legendary king of Connacht. The castle's 75-foot tower and its defensive wall have been restored, and the grounds are open to tourists during the summer.

/Wikipedia.org/

Dunguaire Castle, Ireland

License: CC BY 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY 2.0.Picture by Nicolas Raymond

Dunguaire Castle, Ireland
Dunguaire Castle (Irish: Dún Guaire) is a 16th-century tower house on the southeastern shore of Galway Bay in County Galway, Ireland, near Kinvarra (also spelled Kinvara). The name derives from the Dun of King Guaire, the legendary king of Connacht. The castle's 75-foot tower and its defensive wall have been restored, and the grounds are open to tourists during the summer.

/Wikipedia.org/

Lake Pehoé, Chile

License: CC BY 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY 2.0.Picture by Christopher Michel

Lake Pehoé, Chile
Lake Pehoé and Cordillera del Paine at sunrise. Lake Pehoé (Spanish pronunciation: [peoˈe]) is a surface water body located in Torres del Paine National Park, in the Magallanes Region of southern Chile. The lake is fed mainly by Paine River through the Nordenskjöld Lake, but it also receives the waters of the outlet of Skottsberg Lake.

/Wikipedia.org/

Lake Pehoé, Chile

License: CC BY 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY 2.0.Picture by Christopher Michel

Lake Pehoé, Chile
Lake Pehoé and Cordillera del Paine at sunrise. Lake Pehoé (Spanish pronunciation: [peoˈe]) is a surface water body located in Torres del Paine National Park, in the Magallanes Region of southern Chile. The lake is fed mainly by Paine River through the Nordenskjöld Lake, but it also receives the waters of the outlet of Skottsberg Lake.

/Wikipedia.org/

Lake Pehoé, Chile

License: CC BY 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY 2.0.Picture by Christopher Michel

Lake Pehoé, Chile
Lake Pehoé and Cordillera del Paine at sunrise. Lake Pehoé (Spanish pronunciation: [peoˈe]) is a surface water body located in Torres del Paine National Park, in the Magallanes Region of southern Chile. The lake is fed mainly by Paine River through the Nordenskjöld Lake, but it also receives the waters of the outlet of Skottsberg Lake.

/Wikipedia.org/

Tavurvur (223 m), Papua New Guinea

License: CC BY 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY 2.0.Picture by Taro Taylor

Tavurvur (223 m), Papua New Guinea
Tavurvur is an active stratovolcano that lies near Rabaul, on the island of New Britain, in Papua New Guinea. It is a sub-vent of the Rabaul caldera and lies on the eastern rim of the larger feature. An eruption of the volcano largely destroyed the nearby town of Rabaul in 1994. Mount Tavurvur is the most active volcano in Rabaul caldera.

/Wikipedia.org/

Tavurvur (223 m), Papua New Guinea

License: CC BY 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY 2.0.Picture by Taro Taylor

Tavurvur (223 m), Papua New Guinea
Tavurvur is an active stratovolcano that lies near Rabaul, on the island of New Britain, in Papua New Guinea. It is a sub-vent of the Rabaul caldera and lies on the eastern rim of the larger feature. An eruption of the volcano largely destroyed the nearby town of Rabaul in 1994. Mount Tavurvur is the most active volcano in Rabaul caldera.

/Wikipedia.org/

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

License: CC BY-SA 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Picture by Leonora Enking

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia
Sunset over the Salar de Uyuni. Salar de Uyuni (or Salar de Tunupa) is the world's largest salt flat at 10,582 square kilometers. It is located in the Potosí and Oruro departments in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes and is at an elevation of 3656 m above mean sea level. The Salar was formed as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes. It is covered by a few meters of salt crust, which has an extraordinary flatness with the average altitude variations within one meter over the entire area of the Salar.

/Wikipedia.org/

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

License: CC BY-SA 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Picture by Leonora Enking

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia
Sunset over the Salar de Uyuni. Salar de Uyuni (or Salar de Tunupa) is the world's largest salt flat at 10,582 square kilometers. It is located in the Potosí and Oruro departments in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes and is at an elevation of 3656 m above mean sea level. The Salar was formed as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes. It is covered by a few meters of salt crust, which has an extraordinary flatness with the average altitude variations within one meter over the entire area of the Salar.

/Wikipedia.org/

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

License: CC BY-SA 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Picture by Leonora Enking

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia
Sunset over the Salar de Uyuni. Salar de Uyuni (or Salar de Tunupa) is the world's largest salt flat at 10,582 square kilometers. It is located in the Potosí and Oruro departments in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes and is at an elevation of 3656 m above mean sea level. The Salar was formed as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes. It is covered by a few meters of salt crust, which has an extraordinary flatness with the average altitude variations within one meter over the entire area of the Salar.

/Wikipedia.org/

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

License: CC BY-SA 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Picture by kris krüg

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia
Sunrise over the Salar de Uyuni. Salar de Uyuni (or Salar de Tunupa) is the world's largest salt flat at 10,582 square kilometers. It is located in the Potosí and Oruro departments in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes and is at an elevation of 3656 m above mean sea level. The Salar was formed as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes. It is covered by a few meters of salt crust, which has an extraordinary flatness with the average altitude variations within one meter over the entire area of the Salar.

/Wikipedia.org/

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

License: CC BY-SA 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Picture by kris krüg

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia
Sunrise over the Salar de Uyuni. Salar de Uyuni (or Salar de Tunupa) is the world's largest salt flat at 10,582 square kilometers. It is located in the Potosí and Oruro departments in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes and is at an elevation of 3656 m above mean sea level. The Salar was formed as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes. It is covered by a few meters of salt crust, which has an extraordinary flatness with the average altitude variations within one meter over the entire area of the Salar.

/Wikipedia.org/

Mount Ngauruhoe (2291 m), New Zealand

License: CC BY 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY 2.0.Picture by Colin Bowern

Mount Ngauruhoe (2291 m), New Zealand
Mount Ngauruhoe at sunset. Mount Ngauruhoe is an active stratovolcano or composite cone in New Zealand, made from layers of lava and tephra. It is the youngest vent in the Tongariro volcanic complex on the Central Plateau of the North Island, and first erupted about 2,500 years ago. Although seen by most as a volcano in its own right, it is technically a secondary cone of Mount Tongariro.

/Wikipedia.org/

Mount Ngauruhoe (2291 m), New Zealand

License: CC BY 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY 2.0.Picture by Jeff P

Mount Ngauruhoe (2291 m), New Zealand
Mount Ngauruhoe at sunset. Mount Ngauruhoe is an active stratovolcano or composite cone in New Zealand, made from layers of lava and tephra. It is the youngest vent in the Tongariro volcanic complex on the Central Plateau of the North Island, and first erupted about 2,500 years ago. Although seen by most as a volcano in its own right, it is technically a secondary cone of Mount Tongariro.

/Wikipedia.org/

Angkor Wat, Cambodia

License: CC BY-SA 2.0 This picture is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Picture by Mark Fischer

Angkor Wat, Cambodia
Angkor Wat in afternoon. Angkor Wat is the largest Hindu temple complex and the largest religious monument in the world. The temple was built by a king Suryavarman II in the early 12th century in Yasodharapura, the capital of the Khmer Empire, as his state temple and eventual mausoleum. Breaking from the Shaivism tradition of previous kings, Angkor Wat was instead dedicated to Vishnu.

/Wikipedia.org/

Create your Landmarks list and mark landmarks as visited and want to visit.

Interesting Fact

Navagio Beach, Greece

Navagio Beach has been named Shipwreck Beach since 1983, when the alleged smuggler ship Panagiotis was wrecked on the beach while transporting cigarettes.

Facts about Landmarks

Peaks by Height

Landmark Mount Everest (8848 m)
Landmark K2 (8611 m)
Landmark Manaslu (8163 m)
Landmark Nanga Parbat (8126 m)
Landmark Jengish Chokusu (7439 m)
Landmark Aconcagua (6962 m)

Waterfalls by Height

Landmark Angel Falls
Landmark Gocta Falls
Landmark Yosemite Falls
Landmark Kjelfossen
Landmark Kaieteur Falls
Landmark Nevada Fall

Towers by Height

Landmark Petronas Towers
Landmark Kuala Lumpur Tower
Landmark Tokyo Tower
Landmark Cairo Tower
Landmark Skylon Tower
Landmark Torre del Mangia

G u e s s G a m e s

Guess the landmarks, the countries, the continents and the capitals.

Share an interesting landmark that you have visited or want to visit.

Tips for Trips

Top 10 Landmarks

Top 10 Legends of Landmarks

"Like all great travelers, I have seen more than I remember, and remember more than I have seen."

Benjamin Disraeli

Page 1 of 4      123Next